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BEACH SEINES- PRICES
AND ORDERING

 

Beach Seines, or Shrimp Seines as they are locally called, are a very old method of catching many types of fish, shrimp and bait. Seines have been used for most of recorded history and are still effective today. Using a beach seine to catch shrimp used to be much more common than it is today and most local fishing and bait shops carried beach seines for sale. Beach seining lost popularity for awhile but has seen an increase in the past few years. Unfortunately for those wishing to give it a shot, finding a beach seine to buy has been difficult at best. Recently I have received some requests to order seines and have decided to add them to the website as a regular option.

 


What is a Seine?- Basically a seine is a long net that is designed to be worked by 2 or more people. The net has a pole at each end, lead on the bottom rope and floats on the top rope and is used slowly "herd" and trap the fish or shrimp that is in front of the net. One person holds an end near the shore while the other person walks out into the water and stretches the net between them. While keeping a bow in the net the 2 people drag the net along the beach for some distance and then the person in deeper water begins to swing around towards the beach while the person near the beach stops moving. As the net is pulled onto the beach everything that is now trapped inside of the net is pulled onto the beaches as well.

What is a Seine used for?- The majority of people using a seine in Georgia are targeting shrimp, but some may be after fish and others are just trying to see what is in the ocean. There are many children's programs that use small seines to allow the participants to see first hand what organisms are present along our beaches. In Georgia, most seines are used for catching shrimp. While I do prefer cast netting shrimp, the seine has some definite advantages- especially at certain times of the year. During the summer, when the adult brown shrimp are spawning along the beaches, seines are the only effective way to target the large food shrimp other than using trawling gear from a boat. The shrimp are to scattered to for cast netting to be effective, but many people do very well using a beach seine. Even in the fall, when cast netting is effective and popular, the seine can have advantages. First, for those without boats it is the best way to tap into the great fall runs of white shrimp since they can drive to the islands and beaches. Some years the wind will make cast netting from a boat impossible as well and the seine can save the day. The favorite places for beach seining without a boat is the north end of Tybee Island, the south end of Jekyll Island and on St. Simons Island. Other people will use a boat to get to islands like Ossabaw to seine at night. More info will be included on the shrimp page when I complete it.

How is a Seine tied?- Seines are made of a long strip of monofilament or mulit-filament nylon mesh. I tie mono seines since they are so much easier to use and create much less drag when in use. The mesh is tied to a rope with floats on the top and a rope with lead weights on the bottom. The ends of the top and bottom lines are tied to long poles that are used to drag the net through the water. While simple, the important aspects of a seine are in how it is tied. The height of the net is not only important as far as how deep the water is but also in making sure there is enough netting to allow the seine to "bow" in the water so the mesh is not a flat panel. It is also important to have the correct amount of mesh in relation to the length of the net. I tie my nets on a 1/2 basis. This means that I use 150ft of mesh for every 100ft of finished net.

Options- The nets listed below in the price section are the basic nets that I tie and meet the minimum mesh and maximum net size for use in Georgia. Other states have different laws that will have to be checked. The basic net is the same and really the main option is the length of the net. Other options that are available are different mesh sizes, different mesh diameter (strength of the mesh) and height of the net. These options will change the price of the net from those listed below. One thing to remember when ordering a net- while a heavier mesh diameter means that the net will be stronger and less prone to holes and tearing, the thicker mono will create much more drag and make using the net much harder and more tiring. This is also the case with the mesh size. The larger the mesh the less drag and the easier the net will be to use.

BEACH SEINE PRICES

The seines are tied on a 1/3 basis, 150ft of mesh for each 100ft of finished net. The 6ft tall net is made of mesh that is 8 ft tall to allow the net to work properly. The mesh is tied approx. every 6 inches with a 1 1/5 ounce lead approx. every 12 inches and a float approx. every 36". The actual distance will vary depending on the mesh size.

 

5/8" bar (1 1/4" stretch) mesh- 6ft tall seine with #139 mesh (approx. 17lb mono)

30 feet long

$115.00

40 feet long

$140.00

50 feet long

$150.00

60 feet long

$180.00

75 feet long

$215.00

100 feet long

$270.00

 

1/2" bar (1" stretch) mesh- 4ft tall seine with #104 mesh (approx. 12lb mono)
(This net is legal to use in Georgia saltwater creeks)

12 feet long

$50.00

 

1/2" bar (1" stretch) mesh- 6ft tall seine with #104 mesh (approx. 12lb mono)

(1/2 mesh up to 40ft long is legal in South Carolina)

30 feet long

$130.00

40 feet long

$155.00

50 feet long

$170.00

75 feet long

$245.00

100 feet long

$325.00

 

The prices above do not include shipping. For ease of shipping, the nets do not include poles but they can be purchased if you are local and not having the net shipped. The poles are made of PVC that is at least as tall as the net. Holes for the float and lead lines are drilled at the bottom and top and the net tied on. Additionally, I like to glue a PVC cap on the bottom of the pole to make it easier to slide over the bottom. It is a good idea to drill a hole in the cap to let the water run out though. I also now offer PVC poles that will break down into a 4ft long package, the top part of the pole retracts into the bottom section. Please ask for more information if interested.

 

Regular 6 6 Poles

$25.00

4ft Take-down Poles

$35.00

 

-Prices Subject to Change

ORDERING

To order a net, please call or send an email or letter to:

Tim Currie
Currie Custom Cast Nets
1174 Halyard Way SE
Townsend, GA 31331

(912)368-5452
email: tcurrie@curriecustomnets.com

Please include the info about the net that you want- size, mesh, weight and other options. If you are not sure what custom net you want or need, please contact me with some info on what you want to do with the net, your abilities and where you will be using the net. I will give you some suggestions to help you decide on the net that is right for you.

If you order a net, I will need to receive payment before I ship the net. Right now I accept payment 3 ways. If you want to make an online or credit card payment, I accept PayPal payments but will have to add a 3% service charge. If you want to pay by personal check, I will need to have some time to let the check clear before shipping the net. If you pay by Money Order or Cashier's check then the net will ship as soon as I finish the net and receive the payment. When you request the quote or place an order I will let you know how long it will take to finish your net so you don't pay to far in advance. However if you are paying by check it might be in your favor to send it early so it has time to clear. Shipping is not included in the net prices and will be determined at the time ordering.

 

 

Home Page  Cast Nets and Ordering  Beach Seines  Choosing a Net  Why a Custom Net?  Throwing Techniques  
Care and Repair  Shrimp, Mullet or Bait  Links

 

 

Tim Currie
Currie Custom Cast Nets
1174 Halyard Way SE
Townsend, GA 31331

(912)368-5452
email: tcurrie@curriecustomnets.com

Copyright 2001-2009 by T. Currie
All Rights Reserved